Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Links of Interest


PLANNING YOUR NOVEL:


PROMO VIA RADIO, TV AND PODCASTS:


TRAPS, REAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL THAT SHOULD CATCH YOUR CHARACTER:


HOW TO PREP FOR AUTHOR EVENTS:


CONTRACTS, THE DANGER OF GRANT OF RIGHT CLAUSES:


DISCOVERING YOUR CHARACTERS’ SECRETS:


PLANNING YOUR NOVEL’S BEGINNING:


COPYRIGHT SPAM, DON’T REGISTER YOUR COPYRIGHT LIKE THIS:


FIGURING OUT THE WHY AND WHO BEFORE YOU START WRITING:


USING CINEMATIC TECHNIQUE  IN YOUR WRITING:


RESOURCES FOR REBRANDING OR REDESIGNING THE LOOK OF YOUR BLOG:


CYBERSECURITY FOR YOU AND YOUR KIDS IF YOU HAVE THEM:


PLANNING YOUR NOVEL’S MIDDLE:


ADVERTISING YOUR BOOKS:


RETURNING TO OLD MANUSCRIPTS:


AN AGENT AND AN EDITOR DISCUSS CONTRACT NEGOTIATION:


PLOT 101, ROMANCES:


DEVELOPING PLOT AND CHARACTER:


DIALOGUE:


Monday, October 13, 2014

Prologues


Do you need a prologue?

Used correctly, a prologue can add to a novel. The problem is that most prologues are nothing but back story or an info dump which adds nothing but a boring beginning.

Most inexperienced writers believe that the reader has to be told everything up front, or she won't understand.

Readers understand, though, and they are often bored to death, as well, by an unnecessary prologue.

You have just a few pages to grab the reader or that editor so you have to get their attention immediately and hold them through the whole novel.

If the prologue does that and the first chapter can't, then the prologue works. If it doesn't, cut it out and sprinkle the information as needed.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Links of Interest


HOW TO RAMP UP TENSION IN YOUR NOVEL:


HOW TO REQUEST REVERSIONS OF RIGHTS FROM YOUR PUBLISHER, AKA HOW TO GET YOUR BOOK BACK WHEN YOUR PUBLISHER FAILS YOU:


HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN GALLEYPROOF WITH WORD:


BOOKS ON MEDIEVAL  FIGHTING:


HOSTING AN ONLINE BOOK EVENT:


MAKING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA:


GOING UNDERCOVER, LINKS:


NINE WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR AUDIOBOOK:


THE RIGHT VERSUS THE WRONG AMOUNT OF DETAIL IN YOUR WRITING:


TURNING YOUR WRITING CAREER INTO A BUSINESS:


CREATING GREAT ENDINGS:


WHEN TO REVISE WHAT IN YOUR MANUSCRIPT:


BUILDING YOUR CHARACTERS ONE INTERVIEW AT A TIME:


PROMOTION, BUILDING YOUR AUDIENCE WITH NOVELLAS:


Monday, October 6, 2014

Showing versus Telling


QUESTION: Is there one hard and fast way to always show instead of tell?  

If you stay firmly in the viewpoint character's head and feel and see what she/he feels and sees, you will never tell rather than show.

Take the example of fear.  If you are afraid, you don't just think to yourself, I am afraid. If you think that, you really aren’t that afraid.

Instead, you may feel a shiver run down the spine, your heart will pick up speed, your body could tremble, etc., etc. 

If you write about what the fear feels like, that's showing.  If you just say that the character is afraid, that's telling.

How do you get so firmly in a character's head?  Part of it is practice.  Part of it is acting.

One of the most popular methods of learning acting these days is called The Method.  The actor is supposed to immerse herself into the character so that she isn’t acting, she’s actually the person.

One variation of The Method is called Being in the Moment.  I like that as a metaphor for what a writer does.

Put yourself in the moment of the scene.  

When you are ready to write a scene, close your eyes and imagine where your viewpoint character is.  What surrounds her?  Are any of the objects around her of importance?  How are they important?  What are the sounds?  The smells?  Who else is around her?  How does she feel about them?  How will she physically react to them?  

Now open your eyes and start typing.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Links of Interest


HOW TO DEAL WITH CYBERBULLIES AND TROLLS:


SHOULD YOU CUT OUT THAT CHARACTER?


GETTING RID OF “THE STUPID” AFTER THE FIRST DRAFT:


LINKS TO PROMOTION RESOURCES:


WORLDBUILDING A GUILD:


USING ADVERBS THAT ARE STRONG, NOT EVIL:


THE SCIENCE OF SPACE BATTLES (VIDEO):


COMMONLY MISUSED IDIOMS:


YOUR SCENE NEEDS A PROBLEM:


FINDING YOUR BOOK’S AUDIENCE:


MAKING READERS CARE BECAUSE THE CHARACTER CARES:


THE TYRANT AS CHARACTER:


TEN THINGS PEOPLE HATE ABOUT SECONDARY CHARACTERS:


BAD BOYS CAN’T BE TOO MUCH OF A JERK AT THE BEGINNING:


COPYRIGHT RELATED NEWS:


USING RITUAL AND ROUTINE TO IMPROVE YOUR WRITING:


FIVE TIPS FOR PLOTTING A MYSTERY:


ENDING WITHOUT CLOSING UP THE WORLD:


TIPS FOR POV WHEN IT’S COMPLICATED:


HOW MOVIE ADAPTIONS OF BOOKS CAN TEACH YOU WHAT TO PUT IN AND WHAT TO TAKE OUT:


Monday, September 29, 2014

Time Travel


"I hate temporal mechanics!" --Chief Engineer Miles O'Brien, STAR TREK: DEEP SPACE NINE

Lately, it seems every time I start flipping through TV channels, I come across some old TV episode that involves time travel. STAR TREK in all its permutations travels through time, the CHARMED witches travel through time, some poor fool on THE TWILIGHT ZONE travels through time, etc., etc. 

Time travel also seems to be one of the new spices added to different paranormal book series to change them up a bit. 

The biggest problem with time travel, beyond the mind-numbing paradoxes, is the “never mind” factor when the author uses time travel to fix things.

Something really horrible happens to the main characters, more than a few die, evil starts taking over the world, and life as we know it is about over, then one of the good guys uses time travel to go back before it starts and stops whatever the original cause of the whole mess was. Everything returns to exactly the way it was before the story started.

In other words, nothing really happened because nothing changes. I always say “never mind” in my best Emily Litella voice then something rude about the writing.

That “never mind” moment means you are cheating the reader of genuine experience. If unhappiness, danger, and death no longer can be trusted to have meaning, the reader may stop caring when permanent changes happen.

The reader can also feel cheated to the point she no longer trusts anything you write and may very well say “never mind” when your next book is out.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Links of Interest


THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS AND TWO VIRTUES OF PROLOGUES:


PRE-ORDERS AND HOW TO BUILD THEM:


WORLDBUILDING, HOW RELIGION SHAPES CHARACTER:


CREATING THE SOCIOPATHIC CHARACTER:


CREATING AN EDITORIAL MAP FOR REVISIONS:


THE FOUR TYPES OF VILLAINS:


DIVERSIFYING YOUR REVENUE STREAM:


BASIC OVERVIEW OF WRITING HISTORICAL FICTION:


THE POWER OF A CHARACTER KEEPING A SECRET:


ENGAGE YOUR READER WITH DEEP POV:


URBAN FANTASY SHORT STORY MARKET:


FREE APS FOR WRITERS:


WHAT NEW ADULT IS:


SELF-PUBLISHING CHECK LIST:


THE BASICS OF SOCIAL MEDIA FOR AUTHORS:


WHAT IS YOUR THEME?


POINT OF VIEW BASICS:


THREE COMMON PROBLEMS WITH TELL VERSUS SHOW:


HOOKING A READER FROM PAGE ONE:


BRAINSTORMING THE MAIN CHARACTER BEFORE YOU WRITE:


CHOOSING YOUR POV CHARACTER:


CONNECTING YOUR CHARACTER TO THE SETTING:


NANO WRITE TO DO LIST FOR STARTING THAT NOVEL: