Monday, November 29, 2010

CRITIQUING: Questions to Use, Part 2

[The critique questions below are only some of the questions you'll ask yourself as you critique another person's work. Add to this list as you need to. ]



CRAFT QUESTIONS


Point of view:


Is the proper point of view maintained in each scene?

Would a scene work better from another character's viewpoint?

Is there only one viewpoint character in each scene?


Interior monologues/introspection:


Does this interior monologue slow the scene too much?

Could this information or emotion be expressed in dialogue or action?

Is the writer telling too much?


Sentence structure:


Do the sentences vary in length?

Does the language fit the actions?

Are there long sentences for leisurely, more introspective moments, and short, terse sentences and words for action scenes?


Language:


Does the author intrude, or is she invisible so the story can tell itself?

Does cause and effect happen correctly?

Is she showing rather than telling?


WORLDBUILDING


Is the worldbuilding well thought out?


Is it logical?


Does the writer break her own rules?


If a myth or fantasy element is changed from common knowledge, is it a logical or understandable change?


Is it explained? (a vampire who can survive full sunlight, for example)


SUMMATION: These are just some of the questions you can ask as you critique. As you gain experience and learn the other writer's strengths and weaknesses, you'll be able to refine your questions.


~*~


Marilynn's Workshop Schedule and Information Links

http://marilynnbyerly.com/workshopschedule.html




Writing the First Chapter, January 3-31, 2011.


Drawing a reader into the first chapter of your novel is more than an exciting beginning, more than a “cute meet,” more than a sexy hero and a feisty heroine. Step by step, I'll show you the craft needed to draw the reader into your novel and make her eager to keep reading. I'll also show you how to set up the goals for the main characters and for the novel.


~*~


Writing in the Moment, April 11-May 8, 2011


How to get your voice, viewpoint, and craft so perfect that you disappear and your story comes alive. Lots of worksheets.

~*~


The Blurb: Mother of All Promotions July 25-August 7, 2011


A blurb is the pithy description of your novel in a query letter, the short "elevator pitch" used at a writer's conference, the log line for online promotion, and the all important back cover copy for a published novel. Without a great blurb, a novel won't be noticed by agents and editors.


Marilynn Byerly--creator of a blurb system used by university publishing courses, publishers, and many authors-- will show you how to create that perfect blurb for your novel. The course will include a number of worksheets and in-class blurb analysis.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

NEGOTIATING YOUR OWN CONTRACT:


http://mysterywritingismurder.blogspot.com/2010/11/negotiating-your-own-contract.html


QUERIES: What should be included.


http://blog.writersdigest.com/norules/2010/11/18/UltimateBlogSeriesOnNovelQueries7.aspx


KNOW YOUR GENRE:


http://scotteagan.blogspot.com/2010/11/if-you-cant-define-your-genre-how-do.html


SETTING THE MOOD:


http://mysterywritingismurder.blogspot.com/2010/11/setting-mood.html


ZOMBIES: A history of zombies in American culture. Well worth the read.


http://io9.com/5692719/a-history-of-zombies-in-america


SELF-PUBLISHING: Via the Kindle, an agent's POV.


Part 1


http://bookendslitagency.blogspot.com/2010/11/launching-your-career-via-kindle.html


Part 2


http://bookendslitagency.blogspot.com/2010/11/building-your-career-on-kindle.html



THE PUBLISHING LIFE: Yes, a contracted work can be cancelled and why it might be.


http://behlerblog.com/2010/11/21/canceling-a-project-reality-check/



WORLDBUILDING: Focusing your worldbuilding efforts.


http://talktoyouniverse.blogspot.com/2010/11/focus-your-worldbuilding-efforts.html


RETURNS: What it means in publishing. (Hint: many happy returns is an oxymoron.)


http://pimpmynovel.blogspot.com/2010/11/terms-to-know-returns.html


MARKET NEWS: Mainly sf/fantasy. Novels and short stories.


http://pbackwriter.blogspot.com/2010/11/sub-ops-ten.html



WORD COUNT:


http://storyflip.blogspot.com/2010/11/word-count-to-wise-handling-your-word.html





~*~


Marilynn's Workshop Schedule and Information Links

http://marilynnbyerly.com/workshopschedule.html




Writing the First Chapter, January 3-31, 2011.


Drawing a reader into the first chapter of your novel is more than an exciting beginning, more than a “cute meet,” more than a sexy hero and a feisty heroine. Step by step, I'll show you the craft needed to draw the reader into your novel and make her eager to keep reading. I'll also show you how to set up the goals for the main characters and for the novel.


~*~


Writing in the Moment, April 11-May 8, 2011


How to get your voice, viewpoint, and craft so perfect that you disappear and your story comes alive. Lots of worksheets.

~*~


The Blurb: Mother of All Promotions July 25-August 7, 2011


A blurb is the pithy description of your novel in a query letter, the short "elevator pitch" used at a writer's conference, the log line for online promotion, and the all important back cover copy for a published novel. Without a great blurb, a novel won't be noticed by agents and editors.


Marilynn Byerly--creator of a blurb system used by university publishing courses, publishers, and many authors-- will show you how to create that perfect blurb for your novel. The course will include a number of worksheets and in-class blurb analysis.



~*~


Marilynn's Workshop Schedule and Information Links

http://marilynnbyerly.com/workshopschedule.html




Writing the First Chapter, January 3-31, 2011.


Drawing a reader into the first chapter of your novel is more than an exciting beginning, more than a “cute meet,” more than a sexy hero and a feisty heroine. Step by step, I'll show you the craft needed to draw the reader into your novel and make her eager to keep reading. I'll also show you how to set up the goals for the main characters and for the novel.


~*~


Writing in the Moment, April 11-May 8, 2011


How to get your voice, viewpoint, and craft so perfect that you disappear and your story comes alive. Lots of worksheets.

~*~


The Blurb: Mother of All Promotions July 25-August 7, 2011


A blurb is the pithy description of your novel in a query letter, the short "elevator pitch" used at a writer's conference, the log line for online promotion, and the all important back cover copy for a published novel. Without a great blurb, a novel won't be noticed by agents and editors.


Marilynn Byerly--creator of a blurb system used by university publishing courses, publishers, and many authors-- will show you how to create that perfect blurb for your novel. The course will include a number of worksheets and in-class blurb analysis.

Monday, November 22, 2010

CRITIQUING: Questions to Use

[The critique questions below are only some of the questions you'll ask yourself as you critique another person's work. Add to this list as you need to. ]

Critiquing a chapter over a period of time. (Several rewrites)


The first critique should be an overview of plot and character. Questions you should ask include--


Does this chapter advance the story?


Tell more about the characters?


Give plot information?


Does it work with the chapter before it?


Later critiques should also examine the nuts and bolts of grammar, spelling, language, dialogue, point of view, correct historical and scientific information, etc.


Specific elements to examine in a general critique


PLOT


Do the characters and plot work well together, or is the plot just pasted on?


Does it make sense?


Does one thing lead to another?


Has the story started at the right place?


Does the action escalate?


Are more plot questions asked before a plot question is resolved?


Does the plot fit genre boundaries?


CHARACTERS


Does each character sound different?


Are the characters doing what they, as characters and personalities, should be doing, or are they being moved around for the convenience of the author?


Do we understand why they are doing certain things?


Does each major character have a strength and a weakness which will be affected by the plot?


In the romantic relationship, is their emotional conflict strong enough for the length of the work?


Will it take more than one long talk to resolve their conflict?


Does their romantic relationship work with the action plot?


In the action plot, is the conflict between the hero and his opponent strong enough?


Is the opponent strong enough to really push the hero to his limits?


Next week, I'll cover craft and worldbuilding questions.


~*~


Marilynn's Workshop Schedule and Information Links

http://marilynnbyerly.com/workshopschedule.html




Writing the First Chapter, January 3-31, 2011.


Drawing a reader into the first chapter of your novel is more than an exciting beginning, more than a “cute meet,” more than a sexy hero and a feisty heroine. Step by step, I'll show you the craft needed to draw the reader into your novel and make her eager to keep reading. I'll also show you how to set up the goals for the main characters and for the novel.


~*~


Writing in the Moment, April 11-May 8, 2011


How to get your voice, viewpoint, and craft so perfect that you disappear and your story comes alive. Lots of worksheets.

~*~


The Blurb: Mother of All Promotions July 25-August 7, 2011


A blurb is the pithy description of your novel in a query letter, the short "elevator pitch" used at a writer's conference, the log line for online promotion, and the all important back cover copy for a published novel. Without a great blurb, a novel won't be noticed by agents and editors.


Marilynn Byerly--creator of a blurb system used by university publishing courses, publishers, and many authors-- will show you how to create that perfect blurb for your novel. The course will include a number of worksheets and in-class blurb analysis.




Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Links of Interest

PLOT CONFLICT: Making your characters' choices harder.


http://storyflip.blogspot.com/2010/11/find-your-plot-fridays-forcing-issue.html


THE SERIES NOVEL:


http://www.alanrinzler.com/blog/2010/11/13/what-makes-a-book-publisher-drool-can-you-say-“series”/


CRAFT: Archetypes versus stereotypes.


http://letthewordsflow.wordpress.com/2010/11/11/archetypes-not-stereotypes


PLOT CONFLICT: What kinds there are and how to insert them.


http://edittorrent.blogspot.com/2010/11/force-conflict.html


THE DREADED PLOT HOLE:


http://writeitsideways.com/checking-for-plot-holes-does-your-story-add-up


CHARACTER EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT:


http://plotwhisperer.blogspot.com/2010/11/personal-glimpse-into-character.html


WORLDBUILDING: Magic Systems.


http://magicalwords.net/stuart-jaffe/writing-magic-systems-as-characters/


CRAFT: Seven things characters do too much.


http://stiryourtea.blogspot.com/2010/11/7-things-your-characters-do-too-much.html


BLOGS: Putting gadgets on your sidebars.


http://enterthebetween.blogspot.com/2010/11/gadgets-in-sidebar.html


FACEBOOK PROMOTION:


http://www.amarketingexpert.com/14-ways-to-make-your-facebook-page-fun-and-lively/



AGENT QUERIES: What to do and not to do.


http://www.guidetoliteraryagents.com/blog/Agent+Mollie+Glick+Talks+7+Things+Agents+Want+To+See+In+A+Query+And+9+Things+They+Dont.aspx



CREATING SUSPENSE WITH FORESHADOWING:


http://www.guidetoliteraryagents.com/blog/Agent+Mollie+Glick+Talks+7+Things+Agents+Want+To+See+In+A+Query+And+9+Things+They+Dont.aspx


SHOULD YOU USE A PEN NAME?


http://menwithpens.ca/pen-name-pseudonym


BLOG SECURITY: Blog Hacking.


http://procrastinatingwritersblog.com/2010/11/this-blog-got-hacked-and-so-could-yours


USING IMAGERY, SYMBOLISM AND FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE:


http://childrenspublishing.blogspot.com/2010/11/deepening-your-novel-with-imagery.html


VISUAL CUES AND GESTURES IN WRITING CHARACTER: Includes list of possibilities.


http://www.darkangelwritingandreviews.com/2010/11/art-of-gesture.html


INTRODUCING A CHARACTER:


http://storytellersunplugged.com/blog/2010/11/09/let-their-reputation-precede-them-introducing-characters-for-maximum-impact/


ACTION/ADVENTURE NOVELS:


http://www.dailywritingtips.com/the-actionadventure-genre/


POV: Using multiple viewpoints.


http://lydiasharp.blogspot.com/2010/11/special-guest-post-multiple-points-of.html


PUBLISHING: To self-publish or not.


http://behlerblog.com/2010/11/15/dear-publishers-do-we-even-need-you/


FREEWARE FOR WRITERS:


http://pbackwriter.blogspot.com/2010/11/freely-ten.html


BLOG TOURS:


http://storyflip.blogspot.com/2010/11/i-did-it-my-way-tips-on-doing-blog-tour.html


GREAT EXAMPLES OF THE TAGLINE: The article in on the YA market but has some great examples of premise hooks.

http://kidlit.com/2010/11/08/is-contemporary-ya-a-difficult-market/


ONE LINE QUERY HOOKS THAT SOLD BOOKS:


http://blog.writersdigest.com/norules/2010/11/15/UltimateBlogSeriesOnNovelQueries5.aspx


LINKS TO DIFFERENT TYPES OF THESAURI:


http://writingwhilethericeboils.blogspot.com/2010/11/four-tools-to-help-you-write-your-novel.html


THE LANGUAGE OF THE EYES IN FICTION:


http://talktoyouniverse.blogspot.com/2010/11/body-language-eye-gaze-in-life-and.html


CONTRACTS: Clause of First Refusal.


http://bookendslitagency.blogspot.com/2010/11/your-option-clause.html


QUERIES: What to put in your bio. paragraph.


http://blog.writersdigest.com/norules/2010/11/16/UltimateBlogSeriesOnNovelQueries6.aspx


THE WRITER'S PHOTO:


http://clarissadraper.blogspot.com/2010/11/writers-bio-how-to-authors-photothat.html


~*~


Marilynn's Workshop Schedule and Information Links

http://marilynnbyerly.com/workshopschedule.html




Writing the First Chapter, January 3-31, 2011.


Drawing a reader into the first chapter of your novel is more than an exciting beginning, more than a “cute meet,” more than a sexy hero and a feisty heroine. Step by step, I'll show you the craft needed to draw the reader into your novel and make her eager to keep reading. I'll also show you how to set up the goals for the main characters and for the novel.


~*~


Writing in the Moment, April 11-May 8, 2011


How to get your voice, viewpoint, and craft so perfect that you disappear and your story comes alive. Lots of worksheets.

~*~


The Blurb: Mother of All Promotions July 25-August 7, 2011


A blurb is the pithy description of your novel in a query letter, the short "elevator pitch" used at a writer's conference, the log line for online promotion, and the all important back cover copy for a published novel. Without a great blurb, a novel won't be noticed by agents and editors.


Marilynn Byerly--creator of a blurb system used by university publishing courses, publishers, and many authors-- will show you how to create that perfect blurb for your novel. The course will include a number of worksheets and in-class blurb analysis.